Vrihannaradiyapurana
  • Agarbha

    Prāṇāyāma (pranayama), or yogic breath control techniques for expanding and channeling the life force attained without silent prayers or meditation are known as agarbha prāṇāyāma.

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  • Anabhivadya

    Primarily, kṣatriya (kshatriya) and the other two varṇa (varna; caste) are not worthy of a brāhmaṇa‘s (brahmana) greetings [Sanskrit abhivādana (abhivadana) means ‘greetings’. Anabhivādya (anabhivadya) literally means ‘ungreetable’ or ‘not worthy of salutation’]. An atheist, one without a sense of respect, one who is ungrateful, a village priest, a sinner, a heretic, a fallen ignorant, an […]

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  • Anadhyaya

    Anadhyāya (anadhyaya) literally means ‘not to study’. Ancient Indian society fixed certain dates and events (natural as well as man-made) on or during which studying (traditional texts and knowledge) was prohibited. This act of refraining from study – in general or of a particular branch of knowledge – is called anadhyāya. Purāṇas (Purana) vary in […]

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  • Anasuya – 1

    Primarily, anasūyā (anasuya) is an inherent quality. Mahābhārata (Mahabharata) has equated this quality with courteousness and virtuosity. The great affliction felt within by one at witnessing the abundance of another’s material prosperity is called asūyā (asuya). The principle of not entertaining the feeling of asūyā is defined as anasūyā— dhanādyairadhikaṃ dṛṣṭvā bhṛśaṃ manasi tāpanam. asūyā kīrtitā sadbhistadayoge’nasūyatā. […]

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  • Angshumana – 1

    According to some Purāṇas (Puranas), all but four of the sixty thousand sons born of King Sagara’s first wife perished by the fire of Sage Kapila’s wrath. Pañcajana (Panchajana)(Pañcavana or Panchabana according to Vāyupurāṇa or Vayupurana) was one of the sons of King Sagara who survived. Śivapuraṇa (Shivapurana) states that Pañcajana became king after Sagara. Aṃśumāna (Angshuman) was Pañcajana’s […]

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  • Atithi – 1

    Since the Ṛgvedic (Rigvedic) period, Indian culture has conceived of the guest (atithi) as one who must be treated with respectful and humble hospitality and offered food and shelter. The host should do everything within his power to please the guest. Any yajña (yajna) would require fire (agni; imagined as the Fire-god), therefore fire has been […]

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