Markandeyapurana
  • Adhakya

    The land called Bhogavardhana, situated in the Dakṣināpatha ( Dakshinapatha; the path towards Sothern India).

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  • Adhraraka

    A township situated in the eastern part of India.

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  • Adri – 1

    The father of Balāka (Balak), a rākṣasa (rakshasha) as mentioned in Purāṇas (Puranas).

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  • Adrija

    A river that annihilates sin, coming from Ṛkṣa (Riksha) or Vindhya mountain ranges.

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  • Agni – 1

    Agni is the Sanskrit word for ‘fire’. Agni is one of the foremost among the Vedic deities. In regard of the number of Vedic hymns (sūkta; sukta) attributed to the deities, Agni comes only second to Indra (almost two hundred hymns have been dedicated to Agni). Since Agni’s deeds and actions are mainly observable on […]

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  • Agni – 2

    Agni is one of the saptarṣi (saptarshi; seven sages) who lived during the period of reign of Tāmasa (Tamasa) Manu.

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  • Agnibahu – 1

    Agnibāhu (Agnibahu) was the son of the fourteenth Bhautya Manu.  According to another opinion, a hermit sage during the reign of Bhautya Manu was called Agnibāhu. Bhāgavatapurāṇa (Bhagavatapurana) has identified him as Agnirvāhu (Agnirbahu). 

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  • Agnidhra – 1

    Agnīdhra (Agnidhra) was the son of Bhautya Manu, the lord of the fourteenth epoch (manvantara). According to a different opinion, Agnīdhra was one of the seven great sages (saptarṣi; saptarshi) during the reign of Bhautya Manu. 

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  • Agnidhra – 3

    Agnīdhra (Agnidhra) was one of the ten sons born to Viśvakarmā’s (Vishwakarma) daughter Varhiṣmatī (Varhishmati) and  Svāyambhuva (Swayambhuva) Manu. He was made the king of Jambudvīpa (Jambudweepa) — jambudvīpeśvaraṃ cakre agnīdhrantu mahābbalam.  According to some other Puranic variations, all of these ten scions of Manu were not sons of Svāyambhuva Manu, but his grandsons – sons […]

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  • Aja – 17

    Aja is one of the sons of Uttama (or Auttama) Manu, the lord of the third epoch (manvantara).

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  • Akalinga

    A locality situated in the middle part of the country (ancient India). Elsewhere it has also been referred to as ‘Kaliṅga’ (Kalinga). [See Kaliṅga] 

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  • Akrama

    The mountain Ṛkṣa (Riksha) or Skandhapāda (Skandhapada) is the source of the river Ākrāma (Akrama). In a different version, the mountain is called Ṛkṣapāda (Rikshapada).

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  • Akrimi

    Akrimī (Akrimi) is the name given to villages where most people are nefarious and powerful, where people forcefully seize others’ lands if they do not have their own. In these villages live those who have earned the favor of the king.

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  • Akshamala – 3

    Akṣamāla (akshamala) is also known by the name akṣasūtra (akshasutra). It is a garland made of rudrākṣa (rudraksha). When the gods had presented various weapons to goddess Caṇḍikā (Chandika) for slaying the demon Mahiṣāsura (Mahishasura), Prajāpati Dakṣa (Prajapati Daksha) had given her akṣamālā.

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  • Ali

    Ali is an Asura. He approached Brahmarṣi (Brahmarshi; a Brahmana Sage) Pāra (Para) to claim his daughter Kalāvatī (Kalavati). The sage did not consent,and the Asura abused him severely, and killed him, too.

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  • Amritasi

    In Cākṣuṣa (Chakshusha) Manvantara, there had been eight gaṇa(s) (gana; genus) of Amṛtā (Amrita; divine nectre)-consuming gods.The fifth among these gaṇa(s) is named Amṛtāśī (Amritasi).

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  • Amva – 4

    Amvā (Amva) is a term denoting the mother in general, but specifically it refers to Goddess Durgā (Durga), mother of the world. In the hymn of worship uttered by the gods, in Mārkaṇḍeyapurāṇa (Markandeyapurana), it is said that this Amvā is all-pervading in the universe, and she is the highest among those who are to […]

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  • Anagha – 7

    Anagha was the fifth of the seven sons born of Vaśiṣṭha (Vashishtha) to Urjjā (Urjja). During the third epoch of Manu (manvantara), these seven sons of Vaśiṣṭha became saptarṣi (saptarshi) [the seven sages].

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  • Anagha – 8

    While describing the future epochs of Manu (manvantara), Viṣṇupurāṇa (Vishnupurana) chronicles that during the eleventh manvantara, when Dharmasārvarṇi (Dharmasarvani) would become Manu, Anagha would be one of the seven sages or saptarṣi (saptarshi) .

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  • Anala – 2

    Prajāpati (Prajapati) was Manu’s son, and Manu was Brahmā’s (Brahma’s) son. Anala was born of Prajāpati to Śāṇḍilī (Shandili). He was a luminous god. He was one of the eight Vasu. In some Purāṇas (Puranas) it is said that the eight Vasu were born of Kaśyapa (Kashyapa). In others, it is said that they were […]

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  • Anamitra – 3

    Anamitra was one of the sons of Dakṣasāvarṇi (Dakshasavarni) Manu, the ruler of the tenth epoch of Manu (manvantara).

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  • Anamitra – 4

    A sage king (rājarṣi; rajarshi). His wife’s name was Bhadrā (Bhadra) and his son was Ānanda (Ananda). Ānanda later became renowned as Cākṣuṣa (Chakshusha) Manu, the ruler of the sixth epoch of Manu (manvantara).

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  • Angira – 1

    Aṅgirā (Angira) or Aṇgirasa (Angirasa) is one of the six sons born to Brahmā (Brahma) at the beginning of Creation— marīcyatryaṅgirasau pulastyaḥ pulahaḥ kratuḥ; ṣaḍete brahmaṇaḥ putrā bīryavanto maharṣayaḥ. Numerous tales can be found in Purāṇas (Puranas) about the birth of the great sage Aṅgirā. Apart from describing him as a spiritually conceived son of […]

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  • Angirogan

    There were eight gaṇa (gana; groups) of deities in the epoch of Vaivasvata.  Other than the seven gaṇa Āditya (Aditya), Vasu, Rudra, Sādhya(Sadhya), Viśva (Vishva), Marut, Bhṛgu (Bhrigu), the eighth was Aṅgirogaṇa (Angirogana). They are the descendants of Aṅgirā (Angira).

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  • Anibhadra

    A particular ethnic group. A type of the Kirāta (Kirata) tribe. 

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  • Anikata

    Ānīkaṭa (Anikata) is one of the localities in the western part of India, as mentioned in Mārkaṇḍeyapurāṇa (Markandeyapurana). However, in the other Purāṇas (Purana; Mythical Scriptures), the place is referred to under different names. In Vāyupurāṇa (Vayupurana) it is named Kālītaka (Kalitaka), in Brāhmāṇḍapurāṇa (Brahmandapurana), the place is called Kuntala, and in Vāmanapurāṇa (Vamanapurana) it […]

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  • Anima

    Aṇimā (anima) is the name of a yogic feat which enables a performer to decrease his size and even become molecular in appearance as per his wish.    [See Aṣṭasiddhi] 

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  • Anjanaparvata – 1

    A mountain called Trikakuda or Traikakuda has been referred to more than once in Atharvaveda and other Vedic literatures. Maybe the name was inspired by a presence of three peaks of the mountain (Sanskrit kakuda means ‘hump’ or ‘projection’). Atharvaveda was the first book to call this Trikakuda Hills Añjanaparvata (Anjanaparvata) —devāñjana traikakudaṃ pari mā […]

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  • Antargirya

    Antargirya is a locality situated towards the east of Bhārata (Bharata; India).

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  • Anugraha

    Anugraha is son of Bhautya Manu. 

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  • Anumati -5

    Anumati is one of the daughters born of the womb of Śraddhā, and sired by Maharṣi Aṅgirā (Angira). She was the wife of Dhātā (Dhata), and mother of Pūrṇimā (Purnima), as described in Bhāgavatapurāṇa (Bhagavatapurana). According to other Purāṇa(s), Anumati was the daughter born of the womb of Smṛti (Smriti), sired by Aṅgirā (Angira). According […]

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  • Apomurti

    Āpomūrti (Apomurti) was one of the sons born of the womb of Anasūya (Anasuya), sired by Maharṣi(Maharshi; Great Sage) Atri. He is also one of the five Ātreyas(Atreya, son of Atri) born during the Svāyambhuva (Swaymbhuba) Manvantara. According to Vāyupurāṇa (Vayupurana) and Brahmāṇdapurāṇa (Brahmandapurana), during the second Manvantara in future, when Dharmasāvarṇi would be Manu, […]

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  • Apratima – 2

    Apratima is one of the Saptarṣi (Saptarshi; the legendary seven sages) in the third Sāvarṇi (Savarni)Manvantara.

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  • Arshnisena

    Ārṣṇisena (Arshnisena) is an instructor of Yoga. Prince Dama learned the Yoga practices from him.

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  • Aruna – 1

    Aruṇa is born of the womb of Vinatā, the eighth daughter of Dakṣa (Daksha), and sired by the great sage Kaśyapa (Kasyapa). He is the elder brother of Garūḍa (Garuda). He pleased Mahādeva (Mahadeva) with great tapasyā (tapasya; ascetic practices), and was appointed the charioteer of the Sun-god, by grace of Mahādeva. Aruṇa’s wife’s name was […]

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  • Aruna – 2

    A great Daitya (Demon) called Aruṇa, very antagonistic to the gods, lived in Pātala (Patala; the underworld). In order to conquer the gods, he started practicing asceticism in order to please Brahmā (Brahma). Feared by his tapasyā (ascetic practice), the gods went to Brahmā. Hearing all this, Brahmā asked Aruṇa why he had been practicing […]

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  • Arunaspadatirtha

    Aruṇāspadanagara (Arunaspadatirtha) is a nagara (city) located on the bank of the river Varuṇā (Varuna). A Brāhmaṇa (Brahmana), who lived in this town, by help of some oṣadhi (oshadhi; herbal drug) achieved the miraculous power to cross a distance of thousand yojana within a short period.

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  • Asiloma – 1

    Asilomā (Asiloma) is a dānava (danava, demon), born out of the  womb of Danu, and sired by Kaśyapa (Kasyapa) Prajāpati(Prajapati; Ruler of the people). From Mārkaṇḍeyapurāṇa (Markandeyapurana) it is known that Asilomā was one of the senāpati(s) (senapati, warrior-general) of Mahiṣāsura (Mahishasura). When the soldiers of Mahiṣāsura launched an attack on Goddess Durgā (Durga), Asilomā, […]

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  • Aswakuta

    Aśvakūṭa (Aswakuta) is a locality in the middle part of India.

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  • Atharva

    A region located in Central India. Even though the name Atharva is mentioned in Mārkaṇḍeyapurāṇa (Markandeyapurana), the other Purāṇas refer to this land occasionally as Āvanta (Avanta), or as Arvuda or even as Atharvā (Atharva). According to D.C.Sircar, Atharva is another variation of Avantī (Avanti).

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  • Atiratra – 3

    Atirātra (Atiratra) was a fores-dwelling hermit brāhmaṇa (brahmana), who married his daughter off to another brāhmaṇa called Suśarmā (Susarma). [See Uttama – 1] 

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  • Atithi – 1

    Since the Ṛgvedic (Rigvedic) period, Indian culture has conceived of the guest (atithi) as one who must be treated with respectful and humble hospitality and offered food and shelter. The host should do everything within his power to please the guest. Any yajña (yajna) would require fire (agni; imagined as the Fire-god), therefore fire has been […]

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  • Atreya

    People belonging to the Ātreya (Atryeya) community are actually specific type of the Kirāta (Kirata) race.

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  • Atri – 1

    Atri was one of the six supreme patriarch ṛṣi (rishi; sage) — like Marīci (Marichi) and Aṅgirā (Angira) — who were born at the onset of the Creation. Many legends are associated with the birth of these six prime sages, and the great sage Atri is no exception. The foremost of these legends is that all […]

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  • Avanta

    A place located in Aparānta (Aparanta; the other end) or the land of Pāścātya(Paschatya; the Western part of the country). [See Avantī (Avanti)]

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  • Ayana -1

    Thirty days and night or two fortnights make a month. Six months make an Ayana.  Ayana is of two kinds — Dakṣināyana (Daksinayana; the southward journey) and Uttarāyana (Uttarayana; the northward journey). Uttarāyana is the daytime for gods, and Dakṣināyana is their night. So, one whole year makes a full day for the gods.

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  • Ikshula

    Name of a river that has been mentioned along with Vedasmṛtā (Vedasmrita), Vedavatī (Vedavati) and Tridivā (Tridiva) in Jambukhaṇḍavinirmāṇaparva [Jambukhandabinirmanparva; a sub-chapter of Bhīṣmaparva (Bhishmaparva)] of Mahābhārata (Mahabharata). But the source of this river is not given in Mahābhārata. In Vāyupurāna (Vayupurana), river Ikṣulā (Ikshula), along with Trisāmā (Trisama), Ṛtukulyā (Ritukulya), Lāṅgulinī (Langulini), Vaṃśdharā (Vamsadhara), […]

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  • Indivara

    Indīvara (Indivara) was the son of Nalanābha (nalanabha), a Vidyādhara (Vidyadhara, a kind of celestial being or demi-god). In ancient times, Indīvara expressed his desire to study Āyurveda (Ayurveda, the science of longeivity)  from Sage Brahmamitra. The sage was reluctant to teach him, so Indīvara earned this knowledge  secretly. When the truth got disclosed, Brahmamitra […]

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  • Ritavak

    Ṛtavāk (Ritavak) is a ṛṣi (rishi; sage). Towards the end of the tenure of the influence of Revatī (Revati) nakṣatra (nakshatra; star), a son was born to him. Ṛtavāk sought to bring up his son and teach him properly. But the son of the sage became evil-natured, and a shame to the family. In despair, […]

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  • Udavasu – 2

    Udāvasu (Udavasu) is the son of Prajāti (Prajati), in the lineage of of Nābhāga (Nabhaga), son of Vaivasvata Manu. Khanitra, the eldest son of Prajāti, appointed Udāvasu the king of the southern country. Kuśāvarta (Kusavarta), belonging to the order of Gautama, was the priest of Udāvasu.

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