Devibhagavatpurana
  • A

    A or a-kāra is the first orthographical representation of the first sound in the universe – the sound with which begins what is identified as logos – akārastvakṣaro jñeyaḥ.  A is the first syllable of the holy chant of Om (formally called Omkara, pronounced Aum, comprising the syllables a-u-ma). A is considered to be a […]

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  • Achalaa – 2

    Since the Earth or Pṛthivī (Prithivi) appears to be immovable, it is referred to as acalā (achalaa) or immovable.

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  • Achamana

    After eating, drinking, sleeping, travelling, touching hairless lips, changing clothes, discharging semen, urine and faeces, uttering slang words, spitting, before beginning studies,after entering into courtyard or crematory a Brāhmaṇa (Brahmana) should perform punarācamana (act of washing of face, hands and legs once more). That is, if Ācamana is performed in both morning and evening, punarāya (punaraya; […]

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  • Achchhoda

    Acchoda (Achchhoda) is one of the greatest of all the famous lakes mentioned in Purāṇas (Puranas). In significance it is at par with the lakes Mānasa and Vindu. Due to variance in pronunciation it is sometimes spelled as Akṣoda (Akshoda). The lake was dug by a particular sect of manes called Agniṣvātta (Agnishvatta). It is […]

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  • Adikshita

    A person disintereted in initiating himself/herself in the mantras of Viṣṇu (Vishnu), Śakti (Shakti), Sūrya (Surya) or Gaṇapati(Ganapati) owing to personal vanity is known as adīkṣita (adikshita).

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  • Adrika

    One of the apsarās (apsaras) born of Prajāpati Kaśyapa (Prajapati Kashyapa) to Dakṣa’s (Daksha’s) daughter Muni. It is known that when King Uparicara (Uparichara) Vasu used to reside in the divine seven storied abode given to him by Indra, Adrikā, the apsarā, used to live there with him. One day, while King Uparicaravasu (Amāvasu or […]

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  • Agastya

    When God Srīhari (Shrihari) created Urvaśi (Urvashi) from his thighs, all the gods were bewitched by her. Mitra was one of the gods of the pair Mitrāvaruṇa (Mitravaruna). Urvaśī consented when Mitra sought union with her. But Varuṇa (Varuna) followed her, pulling at the corner of her dress. Urvasī told him, “Mitra has courted me […]

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  • Aghora

    One of the nine lesser deities who serve the prime goddess. She serves the goddess when She takes the form of Bhuvaneśvarī (Bhuvaneshwari).

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  • Agni – 1

    Agni is the Sanskrit word for ‘fire’. Agni is one of the foremost among the Vedic deities. In regard of the number of Vedic hymns (sūkta; sukta) attributed to the deities, Agni comes only second to Indra (almost two hundred hymns have been dedicated to Agni). Since Agni’s deeds and actions are mainly observable on […]

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  • Agnidhra – 1

    Priyavrata, son of the first Manu Svāyambhuba (Svayambhuba) and Śatarūpā (Satarupa), is the father of Āgnīdhra. Vahirṣmatī (Vahirsmati), daughter of Prajāpati Visvakarmā (Prajapati Viswakarma), is Āgnīdhra’s (Agnidhra) mother. Āgnīdhra was the ruler of Jambudvīpa (Jambudwipa; a name of ancient Bharatabarsa), surrounded by the lavaṇasamudra (labanasamudra; salt-water sea) His nine sons became the rulers of nine varṣas (varsa; […]

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  • Agnishtoma – 1

    The characteristics of agniṣṭoma yajña (agnishtoma yajna) encapsulate the essence of the entire somayajña (somayajna). Those yajña the details which have been directly laid down by the śruti (shruti; another name of Veda) are known as prakṛti (prakriti) or ‘essence’. Aitareya Brāhmaṇa (Aitareya Brahmana) carries an anecdote about how agniṣṭoma yajña came into being. It is […]

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  • Agnishvatta

    Agniṣvātta (Agnishvatta) is the term referring to a particular sect of the manes (pitṛ; pitri) as well as the space allocated to them. The region called Agniṣvātta, named after the pitṛ residing there, is located in the south of the cosmos, beneath the Earth and above the upper regions of the abyss called atala — […]

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  • Aindri -4

    Aindrī (Aindri) is one of the thousand names of Goddess Gāyatrī (Gayatri).

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  • Ajagava

    Pināka (Pinaka), the bow of Śiva (Siva),  is also known as ‘Ājagava’ (Ajagava). This is called ‘Ajakava’, ‘Ajakāva'(Ajakava)  or ‘Ajagāva’. The way the word ‘Ajakava’ has been analysed in Śabdakalpadruma, seems to indicate that the ‘ka’ has been transformed into ‘ga’ through linuisic evolution. The Puraṅa-scholars  state that ‘aja’ refers to Viṣṇu (Visnu) who is […]

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  • Ajita – 1

    Ajitā (Ajita) is one of the lesser female deities (pīṭhaśakti; pithashakti) attending on the Bhuvaneśvarī (Bhuvaneshwari) form of the primodial mother goddess.                                                             [See Pīṭha]  

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  • Ama – 2

    Āma (Ama) is the son of Ghṛtapṛṣṭha (Ghritaprishtha). Ghṛtapṛṣṭha divided Krauñcadvīpa (Kraunchadwipa) into seven varṣas, and named them after his sons. Āmavarṣa (Amavarsha) is one of these varṣas (varsha; a vast plot of land).

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  • Amoghakshi

    Goddess Bhagavatī (Bhagavati) is known as Amoghākṣī (Amoghakshi) on the bank of river Vipāsā (Vipasa).

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  • Amratakeswaratirtha

    A holy site of pilgrimage mentioned in Kūrmapurāṇa (Kurmapurana). From Bhadreśvaratīrtha (Bhadreswaratirtha, the pilgrimage site of Bhadreswara), one has to visit Āmratakeśvara (Amratakeswara). Goddess Sūkṣmanāsikā (Suksmanasika) resides in this site of pilgrimage.

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  • Amritaugha

    Ghṛtapṛṣṭha (Ghritaprishtha), son of Priyavrata, divided Krauñcadvīpa (Kraunchadwipa) in seven varṣa(s) (varsha; a vast plot of land). There is a varṣanadī (varshanadi; a major river flowing across the varsha) in each varṣa. Amṛtaughā (Amritaugha) is the name of the varṣanadī of Madhuraha varṣa (varsha).

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  • Anagha

    One of the seven major rivers flowing through Śākadvīpa (Shakadweepa; the land of Shaka).

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  • Ananga – 2

    At Lākula (Lakula), a holy place, Harapriyā Pārvatī (Harapriya Parvati) is known as Sarvamaṅgalā Anaṅgā (Sarvamangala Ananga). Alternately, at Bharatāśrama (Bharatashrama), Devī Bhagavatī (Devi Bhagavati) is renowned as Anaṅgā.

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  • Ananta – 1

    Pṛthivī (Prithivi; earth) embodies many forms of nature, and hence it is also known by the name Anantā (Ananta).

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  • Ananta – 1

    The renowned Ananta was born of Kaśyapa (Kashyapa) to Prajāpati Dakṣa’s (Prajapati Daksha’s) ninth daughter, Kadrū (Kadru). Tuṣṭi (Tushti) was Anantadeva’s wife. In the lower part of the hells lies kālāgni (kalagni), the fire of universal annihilation. Beyond that lies haṭṭaka (hattaka), and below that resides Anantadeva. He bears on his head like a grain […]

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  • Ananta- 1

    Ananta was the renowned son born to Kaśyapa (Kashyapa) and Prajāpati Dakṣa’s (Prajapati Daksha’s) ninth daughter Kadrū (Kadru). Anantadeva’s wife was called Tuṣti (Tushti). In the lower parts of the multitudes of hells lies the universal flame of annihilation or kālāgni (kalagni). Below that resides Anantadeva. Balanced on his head like a grain of mustard […]

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  • Anantatritiyavrata

    Observation of Anantatṛtīyāvrata (Anantatritiyavrata) is recommended on the third lunar day.

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  • Anga – 2

    According to Devībhāgavatapurāṇa (Devibhagavatpurana), Aṅga (Anga) was the father of Cākṣuṣa (Chakshusha) Manu, the ruler of the sixth Manu epoch.  

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  • Angira – 1

    Aṅgirā (Angira) or Aṇgirasa (Angirasa) is one of the six sons born to Brahmā (Brahma) at the beginning of Creation— marīcyatryaṅgirasau pulastyaḥ pulahaḥ kratuḥ; ṣaḍete brahmaṇaḥ putrā bīryavanto maharṣayaḥ. Numerous tales can be found in Purāṇas (Puranas) about the birth of the great sage Aṅgirā. Apart from describing him as a spiritually conceived son of […]

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  • Angirasi – 2

    One of the seven rivers running through each of the seven separate parts of the land of Plakṣadvīpa (Plakshadweepa). This river flows through Bhadravarśa (Bhadravarsha).

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  • Anumati – 2

    One of the seven primary rivers flowing through the seven lands (varṣa; varsha) of Śālamalīdvīpa (Salmalidweepa). 

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  • Apyayana – 1

    Āpyāyana(Apyayana) was the son of Priyavrata and the father of Yajñavāhu (Yajnavahu). A varṣa(varsha; a vast plot of land) of Śālmalīdvīpa(Salmalidwipa; the island called Salmali) was named after him.  

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  • Ara

    ‘Ara’ means ‘spoke’ in English. In ancient times, the wheels of a chariot was made of spokes. In the conceptualisation of the Sun’s motion, as if moving in a chariot, the twelve months are imagines to be twelve ‘ara’s or spokes in the wheel of the Sun-god’s chariot.

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  • Aranya – 1

    King Purukutsa was the father of Araṇya (Aranya), and Vṛhadaśva (Vrihadaswa) was his son. Araṇya was very religious-minded and greatly devoted to his father. See Purukutsa/Vṛhadaśva.

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  • Arishtanemi – 5

    In Agnipurāṇa (Agnipurana), Ariṣṭanemi(Arishtanemi) is a progenitor-father. Sixteen sons were born out of the wombs of his wives — ariṣṭanemi-patnīnām apatyanīha ṣoḍaśa. It may be so that Ariṣṭanemi here refers to Kaśyapa (Kasyapa). According to Devibhāgavata (Devibhagavata), Ariṣṭanemi himself had been the founder of a genealogical line. Dakṣa (Daksha) sired six daughters, who were born […]

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  • Arishtanemi – 6

    Ariṣṭanemi was the father of Haṃsa (Hamsa), king of the Gandharva(s) (A kind of demi-gods).(According to Mahābhārata, Haṃsa was the son of Ariṣṭā). As per the description of Purāṇa (Purana; Mythological Scripture), this Haṃsa was reborn as Dhṛtarāṣṭra (Dhritarashtra), son of Vyāsa (Vyasa), in the Kuru dynasty.

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  • Arogya

    In Vaidyanāthadhāma (Vaidyanathadhama; the pilgrimage site sacred to Vaidyanatha), Goddess Bhagavatī (Bhagavati) is known as Ārogyā (Arogya).

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  • Arshabhivithi

    Ārṣabhīvīthi (Arshabhivithi) is the constellation comprised of the three stars, namely, Uttaraphālgunī (Uttaraphalguni), Pūrvaphālgunī(Purvaphalguni) and Maghā (Magha).

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  • Aruna – 1

    Aruṇa is born of the womb of Vinatā, the eighth daughter of Dakṣa (Daksha), and sired by the great sage Kaśyapa (Kasyapa). He is the elder brother of Garūḍa (Garuda). He pleased Mahādeva (Mahadeva) with great tapasyā (tapasya; ascetic practices), and was appointed the charioteer of the Sun-god, by grace of Mahādeva. Aruṇa’s wife’s name was […]

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  • Aruna – 2

    A great Daitya (Demon) called Aruṇa, very antagonistic to the gods, lived in Pātala (Patala; the underworld). In order to conquer the gods, he started practicing asceticism in order to please Brahmā (Brahma). Feared by his tapasyā (ascetic practice), the gods went to Brahmā. Hearing all this, Brahmā asked Aruṇa why he had been practicing […]

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  • Aruna – 4

    Aruṇa (Aruna) is the son of king Haryaśva (Haryaswa), belonging to Sūryavaṁśa (Suryavamsa; the Solar dynasty). He is the father of Triśanku (Trisanku; whose earlier name was Satyavrata). However Bhāgavatapurāṇa (Bhagavatapurana) states that Aruṇa was the father of Trivandhana, and Trivandhana was the father of Satyavrata Triśanku.

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  • Ashadesa

    God Śiva(Siva) is known as Āṣāḍeśa(Ashadesa) in the sacred site called Āṣāḍī (Ashadesa). The name of the goddess here is Ratīśā (Ratisa). In another place, the name of the goddess is Rati.

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  • Aswarudha – 1

    Aśvārūḍhā (Aswarudha) is an incarnation of Goddess Bhuvaneśvarī (Bhuvaneswari).

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  • Atala

    Of the seven tiers of pātāla (patala; the netherworld), the first tier is known as atala. The Puranic texts describe the soil of atala as black. But Viṣṇupurāṇa (Vishnupurana) differs on this matter and describes the soil of atala as white, and the only tier of pātāla to have such soil. This tier of atala boasted exquisite […]

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  • Atikrichchha

    Atikṛccha (atikrichchha) is the name of a (purifying) ritual or vow (vrata) which requires to be observed over a stretch of twelve days. In order to observe this vow, the performer must obey certain rules of eating throughout the twelve-day long phase. For the first three days he should not eat anything but three handfuls […]

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  • Atri – 1

    Atri was one of the six supreme patriarch ṛṣi (rishi; sage) — like Marīci (Marichi) and Aṅgirā (Angira) — who were born at the onset of the Creation. Many legends are associated with the birth of these six prime sages, and the great sage Atri is no exception. The foremost of these legends is that all […]

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  • Attahasa – 3

    A mountain peak in the Himalayan range. Mahādeva (Mahadeva) or Śiva (Shiva) appears on this peak in the twentieth dvāpara (dwapara) era. This peak is a holy place where the goddess Mahānandā (Mahananda) resides. 

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  • Avataudanaraka

    Avaṭauda is a kind of narakakuṇḍa (narakakunda; hell-pit), about 400 hands in depth. The burnt-bodied sinners, chased by the messengers of Yama, stay here. As soon as sinners fall in this naraka, they suffer from all kinds of diseases.

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  • Ayana -1

    Thirty days and night or two fortnights make a month. Six months make an Ayana.  Ayana is of two kinds — Dakṣināyana (Daksinayana; the southward journey) and Uttarāyana (Uttarayana; the northward journey). Uttarāyana is the daytime for gods, and Dakṣināyana is their night. So, one whole year makes a full day for the gods.

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  • Ayurda

    Medhātithi (Medhatithi) divided Śākadvīpa (Sakadwipa) into seven varṣas (varsha; a vast plot of land). In every varṣa, there is a mahānadī (mahanadi, great river). The great river Āyurdā flows across the varṣa called Monojava.

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  • Ekananda

    Ekanandā (Ekananda) is one of the female deities who were partial incarnations of Prakṛti (Prakriti; the goddess Nature), as mentioned in Devībhāgavatapurāṇa (Devibhagavatapurana).

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  • Idhnajihwa

    King Priyavrata sired a son named Idhnajihva (Idhnajihwa), born of the womb of Varhiṣmatī (Varhishmati), daughter of Prajāpati (Prajapati; Ruler of the people) Viśvakarmā (Viswakarma). Priyavrata appointed Idhnajihva, to be the ruler of Plakṣadvīpa (Plakshadwipa, the island of Plaksha). Idhnajihva divided Plakṣadvīpa in seven varṣas (varsha; a vast plot of land) and distributed them among […]

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