Kurmapurana
  • Achamana

    After eating, drinking, sleeping, travelling, touching hairless lips, changing clothes, discharging semen, urine and faeces, uttering slang words, spitting, before beginning studies,after entering into courtyard or crematory a Brāhmaṇa (Brahmana) should perform punarācamana (act of washing of face, hands and legs once more). That is, if Ācamana is performed in both morning and evening, punarāya (punaraya; […]

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  • Adhyayana

    Ten kinds of people are fit to take up studies. They include the son of a teacher, one who is engaged in taking care of others and attending to others’ needs, a purveyor of various kinds of knowledge, a religious or pious person, one who is virtuous or pure, one who is capable of receiving […]

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  • Adipurana

    Ādipurāṇa (Adipurana), narrated by Sage Sanatkumara, is one Upapurāṇa (Upapurana; lesser purana).

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  • Adityayatanatirtha

    A sacred pilgrimage site situated on the northern bank of the river Narmada. On the śuklā saptamī (sukla saptami) tithi of Māgha (Magha), this site becomes more effective to attain virtuous results.

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  • Agnaukarana

    Agnaukaraṇa (agnaukarana) is a process described in the Smṛti (Smriti) scriptures. Agnaukaraṇa is the process of offering cooked rice and sacred ghee as oblations to the holy fire (Agni) at funerals performed on special occasions or at monthly funeral rites. The idea is basically this: while, from among the items required for a funeral rite, […]

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  • Agneyi – 3

    Āgneyī (Agneyi)  is the wife of Uru, son of Cākṣuṣa Manu (Chakshusha Manu) and Nadvalā (Nadwala). Āgneyī (Agneyi) had six sons by Uru, namely — Agni, Sumanā (Sumana), Khyāti (Khyati), Kratu, Aṅgirā (Angira) and Gaya. According to Viṣnupurāṇa, the six sons born of Uru and Āgneyī are : Anga, Sumanā, Svāti (Swati), Kratu, Aṅgirā and […]

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  • Agnibahu – 2

    Agnibāhu (Agnibahu) was one of the ten sons of Svāyambhūva (Swayambhuva) Manu.  According to a different opinion, Agnibāhu was one of the ten sons of Svayambhuva Manu’s eldest son, Priyavrata. Brahmāṇḍapurāṇa (Brahmandapurana) says that Priyavrata’s wife was Kāmyā (Kamya), the daughter of Kardama Prajāpati (Prajapati). Agnibāhu was born to this Kāmyā. Agnibāhu carried memories from […]

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  • Ailavila

    It was the other name of Kuvera. Kuvera was called Ailavila many times in Mahābhārata. According to the Kūrma Purāṇa, Kuvera was born in the womb of Ilavilā, the daughter of sage Triṇavindu. Sage Pulastya was the father of Kuvera. As the son of Ilavilā, Kuvera was known as Ailavila. .

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  • Akshapada – 2

    Son of Somaśarmā (Somasharma). Mahādeva (Mahadeva) had said, during the twenty-seventh Dvāpara (Dwapara) age, the great sage Jātukarṇya (Jatukarnya) would be reborn as Vyāsa (Vyasa). He would be widely known as the great brāhmaṇa (brahmana) Somaśarmā and reside at the holy place of Prabhāsa (Prabhasa). Akṣapāda (Akshapada) was one of the four sons of Somaśarmā.

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  • Alakananda

    Alakānandā (Alakananda) is the name of a pilgrimage site, named after the river. It is said that the river is situated in heaven. Mandākinī (Mandakini) emerges from the feet of God Viṣṇu (Vishnu). After falling upon Merupṛṣṭha (Meruprishtha), the same Mandākinī comes to be known by four names, as it flows in four different directions. […]

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  • Alakatirtha

    Alakātīrtha (Alakatirtha) is a sacred site of pilgrimage located on the bank of the river Narmadā (Narmada). Fasting in this place, after taking a moderate meal at first, makes one get rid of the sin of Brahmahatyā (Brahmahatya; killing a Brahmana). Nothing is known about its present location.

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  • Amratakeswaratirtha

    A holy site of pilgrimage mentioned in Kūrmapurāṇa (Kurmapurana). From Bhadreśvaratīrtha (Bhadreswaratirtha, the pilgrimage site of Bhadreswara), one has to visit Āmratakeśvara (Amratakeswara). Goddess Sūkṣmanāsikā (Suksmanasika) resides in this site of pilgrimage.

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  • Amritavritti

    Amṛtavṛtti (Amritavritti) is to live on whatever comes naturally, that is, not as a result of some specific desire. Things that are not desired are called Amṛta (Amrita).

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  • Amvughatasraddha

    Amvughaṭaśrāddha (Amvughatasraddha) is that śrāddha (sraddha; a ritual dedicated to the deceased), which is to be performed, with piṇḍa (pinda; the consecrated food-ball offered to the spirit) for one year after the demise of the father, and everyday some rituals are to be performed according to pretadharma (the codes of ritual dedicated to the spirit).

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  • Anadhyaya

    Anadhyāya (anadhyaya) literally means ‘not to study’. Ancient Indian society fixed certain dates and events (natural as well as man-made) on or during which studying (traditional texts and knowledge) was prohibited. This act of refraining from study – in general or of a particular branch of knowledge – is called anadhyāya. Purāṇas (Purana) vary in […]

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  • Anagha – 7

    Anagha was the fifth of the seven sons born of Vaśiṣṭha (Vashishtha) to Urjjā (Urjja). During the third epoch of Manu (manvantara), these seven sons of Vaśiṣṭha became saptarṣi (saptarshi) [the seven sages].

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  • Anakadundubhi – 1

    One of the branches of the Yadu clan is Kukuravaṁśa (Kukuravamsa; the Kukura clan). Ānakadundubhi(Anakadundubhi) is the son of Tama, and the grandson of Kapotaromā (Kapotaroma). He performed a great ascetic penance in the Govardhana mountain, and was granted a boon from God Brahmā (Brahma). Receiving this boon, Ānakadundubhi started singing a song in praise […]

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  • Anaraka -1

    This pilgrimage site is situated at Kurukṣetra (Kurukshetra), on the western side of the river Yamuna. Located here are temples of abode dedicated to Brahmā (Brahma) and Mahādeva (Mahadeva). Rudrāṇī (Rudrani) occupies the west, and Padmanābha (Padmanabha) occupies the north of this holy place. It has been referred to as sarvadevatīrtha (sarvadevatirtha, or the place […]

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  • Angareshwara – 1

    Aṅgāreśvara (Angareshwara) is a site of pilgrimage situated on the northern bank of the river Narmadā (Narmada). Rudraloka may be attained as a result of visiting this holy place. The residing deity of Aṅgāreśvara is God Rudraśiva (Rudrashiva). In an alternate version, this place has been noted as Agāreśvara (Agareshwara). It is auspicious to perform […]

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  • Angareshwara – 5

    A holy place situated on the bank of the river Narmadā (Narmada). The site of pilgrimage dedicated to Śiva (Shiva), named Aṇgāreśvara (Angareshwara) is still present on the embankment of the river Narmadā in Vadodara of Gujarat.

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  • Angira – 1

    Aṅgirā (Angira) or Aṇgirasa (Angirasa) is one of the six sons born to Brahmā (Brahma) at the beginning of Creation— marīcyatryaṅgirasau pulastyaḥ pulahaḥ kratuḥ; ṣaḍete brahmaṇaḥ putrā bīryavanto maharṣayaḥ. Numerous tales can be found in Purāṇas (Puranas) about the birth of the great sage Aṅgirā. Apart from describing him as a spiritually conceived son of […]

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  • Angirasatirtha

    Āṅgirā, son of Brahmā, worshipped Śiva in this holy place and achieved uttama yoga ( a high level of yogic power). It is a sacred site of pilgrimage mentioned in Kūrmapurāna.

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  • Anila -1

    One of the eight Vasu (collectively called aṣṭavasu; ashtavasu); father of Manoja and Avijñātagati (Avijnatagati). 

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  • Antyasrama

    Sage Śvetāśvetara (Swetaswetara) initiated king Suśīla (Susila) in the sannyāsīvrata (sannyasivrata; the sacred life of a recluse) belonging to the branch of Vedic tradition he himself belonged to. The Vedic branch is called Antyāśrama (Antyasrana).

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  • Apa – 1

    One of the Asṭavasu (Astavasu; eight Vasus), Āpa  (Apa) is a god with a celestial halo. He has four sons, namely –Śānta (Santa), Vaidaṇda (Vaidanda), Śāmva (Samva) and Munivakra. They are entitled to protect the yajña (yajna; ritual sacrifice). In Brahmāṇdapurāṇa (Brahmandapurana), the name ‘Āyu'(Ayu) or ‘Āya’ (Aya) has been used instead of Āpa. Vaitaṇda […]

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  • Aponara

    God Nārāyaṇa, assuming the Self of Brahman (the Supreme Divinity), was lying on water — upon his anantaśayyā (anantasayya), and that is why he is referred to as Āponārā (Aponara) — āpo nārā iti proktā āpo vai narasūnabaḥ ayanaṃ tasya tā yasmāt tena nārāyaṇaḥ smṛtaḥ.

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  • Apsaresatirtha

    Apsareśatīrtha is a sacred tīrtha (tirtha; site of pilgrimage) located on the bank of the rier Narmadā (Narmada). If some one takes a bath in this tīrtha, he is believed to have access heavenly pleasures and plays along with the Apsarā(s) (Apsara; Celestial courtesans). In Padmapurāṇa (Padmapurana) it is said that having a bath in […]

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  • Apyayana – 2

    Prior to the performance of a Vedic yāga (yaga ; a holy fire-ritual) called ‘Upasat’, the Somalatā (the creeper named Soma, sacred to the Vedic rituals) is sprinkled with water in order to keep it alive. This act is called the āpyāyana (apyayana; gesture of greeting) of Soma. This act is performed for three days, […]

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  • Aruna – 1

    Aruṇa is born of the womb of Vinatā, the eighth daughter of Dakṣa (Daksha), and sired by the great sage Kaśyapa (Kasyapa). He is the elder brother of Garūḍa (Garuda). He pleased Mahādeva (Mahadeva) with great tapasyā (tapasya; ascetic practices), and was appointed the charioteer of the Sun-god, by grace of Mahādeva. Aruṇa’s wife’s name was […]

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  • Arvavasu – 1

    Arvāvasu (Arvavasu) is the name of a special Saurakiraṇa (Saurakirana; solar ray); it is one of the seven major rays of the sun. This adds glow to Vṛhaspati (Vrihaspati). In Vāyupurāṇa (Vayupurana), Arvāvasu (Arvavasu) is mentioned as Arvāgvasu (Arvavasu).

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  • Ascharyapurana

    Āścaryapurāṇa (Ascharyapurana) is one of the Upapurāṇas (Upapurana, lesser Purana) mentioned by Durvāsā (Durvasa).

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  • Ashtaka – 1

    According to scholars, the three Kṛṣṇāṣṭamī tithi(s) (Krishnashtami; the eighth day of a dark fortnight) of the months of Agrahāyaṇa (Agrahayana), Pauṣa (Pausha) and Māgha (Magha) are called Aṣṭakā (Ashtaka).

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  • Asrama -1

    Kūrmapurāṇa (Kurmapurana) has further divided Caturāśrama (Chaturasrama, the four phases of life) in three types, according to the variance amongst Vaiṣṇava (Vaishnava), Brāhma(Brahma) and Śaiva (Saiva). The four āśrama(asrama) emerged from the mind, eyes, ears, and skin of God Nārāyaṇa (Narayana). For the Brāhmaṇa (Brahmana), the four āśrama — Brahmacarya (Brahmacharya), Gārhasthya (Garhasthya), Vānaprastha(Vanaprastha) and […]

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  • Aswastanika

    One who does not have any food in store for his sustenance for the next day, is called Aśvastanika (Aswastanika). In fact ‘śvaḥ‘ (swah) means ‘the next day’. The ‘tan‘ pratyaya, added to it, becomes śvantan (like adyatana, purātana). From this, derives śvastanika’ and in a negative sense, ‘aśvastanika’ Among the four vṛtti(s) (vritti, vocation)of […]

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  • Atikrichchha

    Atikṛccha (atikrichchha) is the name of a (purifying) ritual or vow (vrata) which requires to be observed over a stretch of twelve days. In order to observe this vow, the performer must obey certain rules of eating throughout the twelve-day long phase. For the first three days he should not eat anything but three handfuls […]

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  • Atithi – 1

    Since the Ṛgvedic (Rigvedic) period, Indian culture has conceived of the guest (atithi) as one who must be treated with respectful and humble hospitality and offered food and shelter. The host should do everything within his power to please the guest. Any yajña (yajna) would require fire (agni; imagined as the Fire-god), therefore fire has been […]

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  • Atmatirtha

    The ritual of Yaugika snāna (snana; bath) performed by the Brahmavādī (Brahmavadi; those who preach their faith in the Brahman) is called ātmatīrtha.

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  • Atri – 1

    Atri was one of the six supreme patriarch ṛṣi (rishi; sage) — like Marīci (Marichi) and Aṅgirā (Angira) — who were born at the onset of the Creation. Many legends are associated with the birth of these six prime sages, and the great sage Atri is no exception. The foremost of these legends is that all […]

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  • Atyantikapralaya

    According to Viṣṇupurāṇa (Vishnupurana), pralaya (the great dissolve) is of three kinds. Ātyantikapralaya (Ātyantikapralaya) is one of them. When the Yogis no longer experience any kind of emotional upsurge like joy and sorrow; when all their feelings get dissolved in the great realisation of Paramātman (Paramatman; the Absolute Self) and they attain Brahmajñāna (Brahmajnana; the […]

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  • Ayana -1

    Thirty days and night or two fortnights make a month. Six months make an Ayana.  Ayana is of two kinds — Dakṣināyana (Daksinayana; the southward journey) and Uttarāyana (Uttarayana; the northward journey). Uttarāyana is the daytime for gods, and Dakṣināyana is their night. So, one whole year makes a full day for the gods.

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  • Rinatirtha

    Ṛṇatīrtha (Rinatirtha) is a famous tīrtha (tirtha; site of pilgrimage) on the bank of the river Narmadā (Narmada). Visiting this site, one gets relieved of all sorts of ṛṇa (rina; owing to someone or something; debts).

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  • Umatunga

    Umātuṅga (Umatunga) is a site sacred to God Śiva (Siva). Visiting the ice-covered pinnacle of Umātuṅga, visitors feel pure at heart, and their collected virtues remain unchanged. It is also a good place for performing post-funeral rites dedicated to the deceased. According to Kūrmapurāṇa (Kurmapurana), Goddess Umā (Uma) always resides in this site.

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  • Urdhvavahu – 2

    Ūrdhvavāhu (Urdhvavahu) is one of the sons born of the womb of Ūrjjā (urjja), sired by Sage Vaśiṣṭha (Vasistha). In Raivata Manvantara, when Vibhu became Indra, Ūrdhvavāhu was one of the Saptarṣi (Saptarshi; the legendary seven sages hailed in ancient mythology).

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  • Uru – 1

    Ūru(Uru) is one of the sons sired by Cākṣuṣa(Chakshusha) Manu, and born of the womb of Naḍvalā (Nadvala), daughter of Vairāja(Vairaja)  Prajāpati (Prajapati; Ruler of the people) Araṇya (Aranya). According to Viṣṇupurāṇa (Vishnupurana), Ūru is mentioned as one of the Saptarṣi (Saptarshi; the seven legendary sages) in Cākṣuṣa (Chakshusha) Manvantara.

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  • Uttamapura

    Uttamapura is a site of pilgrimage in Jamvudvīpa (Jamvudwipa). It is located towards the south of Haṁsaśaila (Hansasaila). Noble and great sages reside here. However, its modern location is not known.

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