Vishnupurana
  • Adarsa – 2

    The dictionary meaning of the term Ādarśa (Adarsa) is darpaṇa (darpana) or ‘a miror’. In Bhāgavatapurāṇa(Bhagavatapurana) it is said that Devahūti (Devahuti), daughter of Svāyambhuva (Svayambhuva) Manu, while getting ready for her wedding, decorated herself with new clothes and jewellery, and watched her own reflection in a mirror. It is assumed that from a very […]

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  • Adbhuta – 1

    In the ninth manvantara (epoch; age of a Manu; an astronomical period of time measurement) in the future, when Dakṣasāvarṇi (Dakshasavarni) will become the supreme authority or the designated Manu,  Adbhuta will be the appointed Indra.

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  • Adhahshira – 1

    Adhaḥśirā (Adhahshira) or Adhaḥśiras (Adhahshiras) is a foremost type of hell. Purāṇas (Purana) mention and distinctly elaborate upon numerous hells, and also accord specific types of hell after death for committing specific sins in a lifetime.  Adhaḥśirā is one prominent hell among those. This hell is also known in some places as Adhomukha. 

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  • Adhisimakrishna

    Different purāṇas (puranas) refer to King Adhisīmakṛṣṇa (Adhisimakrishna) as Adhisāmakṛṣṇa (Adhisamakrishna) or Adhisomakṛṣṇa (Adhisomakrishna), but the most commonly used name was Adhisīmakṛṣṇa. Abhimanyu’s grandson was Pārīkṣita (Parikshita) Janamejaya whose son was known as Śatānīka (Shatanika). According to Matsyapurāṇa (Matsyapurana), Adhisomakṛṣṇa was the son of Śatānīka. However, other Purāṇas record that Śatānīka’s son was Aśvamedhadatta (Ashwamedhadatta).This piece […]

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  • Adhvaryu

    At the outset of yajña (yajna) ceremonies, the priest of Ṛgveda (Rigveda), or ṛtvika (ritwika) used to execute the functions of both the priest and the hotā (hota) or the performer of the yajña. [See Ṛtvika, Hotā] Later, when the rituals of a yajña became more intricate, four priests or ṛtvika of Caturveda (Chaturveda) were appointed separate vedic tasks. […]

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  • Agnaukarana

    Agnaukaraṇa (agnaukarana) is a process described in the Smṛti (Smriti) scriptures. Agnaukaraṇa is the process of offering cooked rice and sacred ghee as oblations to the holy fire (Agni) at funerals performed on special occasions or at monthly funeral rites. The idea is basically this: while, from among the items required for a funeral rite, […]

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  • Agneya – 9

    A kind of divine weapon used in warfare in ancient times. After the completion of the Pāṇdava (Pandava) and Kaurava princes, Droṇācarya (Dronacharya) made arrangements for an exhibition of their military skills. In that arena, Arjuna displayed his skill as an archer, by using āgneya astra (agneya astra; firey weapon) to create fire. Sri Kṛṣna […]

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  • Agneyi – 3

    Āgneyī (Agneyi)  is the wife of Uru, son of Cākṣuṣa Manu (Chakshusha Manu) and Nadvalā (Nadwala). Āgneyī (Agneyi) had six sons by Uru, namely — Agni, Sumanā (Sumana), Khyāti (Khyati), Kratu, Aṅgirā (Angira) and Gaya. According to Viṣnupurāṇa, the six sons born of Uru and Āgneyī are : Anga, Sumanā, Svāti (Swati), Kratu, Aṅgirā and […]

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  • Agni – 1

    Agni is the Sanskrit word for ‘fire’. Agni is one of the foremost among the Vedic deities. In regard of the number of Vedic hymns (sūkta; sukta) attributed to the deities, Agni comes only second to Indra (almost two hundred hymns have been dedicated to Agni). Since Agni’s deeds and actions are mainly observable on […]

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  • Agnibahu – 1

    Agnibāhu (Agnibahu) was the son of the fourteenth Bhautya Manu.  According to another opinion, a hermit sage during the reign of Bhautya Manu was called Agnibāhu. Bhāgavatapurāṇa (Bhagavatapurana) has identified him as Agnirvāhu (Agnirbahu). 

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  • Agnibahu – 2

    Agnibāhu (Agnibahu) was one of the ten sons of Svāyambhūva (Swayambhuva) Manu.  According to a different opinion, Agnibāhu was one of the ten sons of Svayambhuva Manu’s eldest son, Priyavrata. Brahmāṇḍapurāṇa (Brahmandapurana) says that Priyavrata’s wife was Kāmyā (Kamya), the daughter of Kardama Prajāpati (Prajapati). Agnibāhu was born to this Kāmyā. Agnibāhu carried memories from […]

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  • Agnidhra – 1

    Agnīdhra (Agnidhra) was the son of Bhautya Manu, the lord of the fourteenth epoch (manvantara). According to a different opinion, Agnīdhra was one of the seven great sages (saptarṣi; saptarshi) during the reign of Bhautya Manu. 

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  • Agnidhra – 3

    Agnīdhra (Agnidhra) was one of the ten sons born to Viśvakarmā’s (Vishwakarma) daughter Varhiṣmatī (Varhishmati) and  Svāyambhuva (Swayambhuva) Manu. He was made the king of Jambudvīpa (Jambudweepa) — jambudvīpeśvaraṃ cakre agnīdhrantu mahābbalam.  According to some other Puranic variations, all of these ten scions of Manu were not sons of Svāyambhuva Manu, but his grandsons – sons […]

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  • Agnimathara

    Vyāsa’s (Vyasa) disciple Paila divided the hymns of Ṛgveda (Rigveda) into two parts and taught the second part to the sage Bāskali (Baskali), who went on to compile four saṃhitā (samhita; supplementary Vedic literatures) from them. Out of these four, the second branch of the Vedic hymns is known as Agnimāṭhara (Agnimathara). According to a […]

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  • Agnimitra – 1

    Agnimitra was the son of Puṣyamitra Śuṅga (Pushyamitra Shunga), the king of Magadha in the epoch of Kali. Agnimitra’s son was called Sujyeṣṭha (Sujyeshtha). Agnimitra reigned for a period of eight years. 

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  • Agnishtoma – 2

    Agniṣṭoma (Agnishtoma) was one of the ten sons born to Naḍvalā (Nadwala), fathered by Cākṣuṣa (Chakshusha) Manu. Because of this he has been referred to as Nāḍvaleya (Nadvaleya) Manu.  Matsyapurāṇa (Matsyapurana) and Brahmāṇḍapurāṇa (Brahmandapurana) refer to him by the name Agniṣṭut (Agnishtut). 

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  • Agnishvatta

    Agniṣvātta (Agnishvatta) is the term referring to a particular sect of the manes (pitṛ; pitri) as well as the space allocated to them. The region called Agniṣvātta, named after the pitṛ residing there, is located in the south of the cosmos, beneath the Earth and above the upper regions of the abyss called atala — […]

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  • Agnivarchas (Agnivarchah)

    Agnivarcas (Agnibarcāḥ)[Agnichas (Agnivarchah)] is the name of a sage who was one of the six disciples of Romaharṣaṇa (Romaharshana), the storyteller. 

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  • Agnivarna

    In the main Rāmāyaṇa (Ramayana) the great sage Vaśiṣṭha (Vashishtha) is seen introducing the Solar Dynasty (Sūryavaṃśa; Suryavangsha) before Rāmacandra’s (Ramachandra) marriage. In this description Agnivarṇa is mentioned as Sudarśana’s (Sudarshana) son and the father of Śīghra (Shighra) or Śīghraga (Shighraga). All of them are Rāmacandra’s ancestors. But in Purāṇas (Purana), Kuśa (Kusha) is Rāmacandra’s […]

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  • Ahamyati

    Ahaṁyāti (Ahamyati) is the son of king Saṁyāti (Samyati), belonging to Puruvaṁśa (Puruvamsa; the genealogical line of Puru). In Mahabhārata (Mahabharata) it is said that Ahaṁyāti was born of the womb of Varāṅgī (Varangi), daughter of king Dṛśadvān (Drisadwan), and wife of Saṁyāti. Bhānumatī, daughter of king Kṛtavīrya(Kritavirya) was the wife of Ahaṁyāti. A son […]

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  • Ahina – 2

    Ahīna (Ahina)was the son of Sahadeva, and father of Jayatsena, in the genealogical line of King Kṣatravṛddha (Kshatravriddha) or Kṣatradharma (Kshatradharma). The name is Adīna according to Vāyupurāṇa (Vayupurana) and Viṣṇupurāṇa (Vishnupurana).

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  • Ahinaka

    Ahīnaka (Ahinaka) or Ahīnaga (Ahunagu) or Ahīnagu (Ahinagu), as found in different readings, was the son of Devānīka (Devanika), and father of Pāriyātra (Pariyatra) or Pāripātra (Paripatra) (or Ruru, according to another version) , in the genealogical line of Kuśa (Kusa), son of Rāmacandra(Ramachandra), belonging to Ikṣvākuvaṁśa (Ikshvakuvamsa; the genealogical line of king Ikshvaku).

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  • Ahuki

    One of the branches of Yaduvaṁśa (Yaduvamsa; the genealogical line of Yadu) is Kukura. Punarvasu, belonging to this Kukuravaṁśa (Kukuravamsa), had a son and a daughter, namely, Āhuka(Ahuka) and Āhukī (Ahuki). Punarvasu probably passed away before the marriage of Āhukī. So it has been mentioned in the Purāṇas (Purana; Mythological Scriptures), that Ākuka got his […]

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  • Aja – 04

    In Rāmāyaṇa (Ramayana), according to ādikavi (adikavi; the first poet, i.e., Vālmīki; Valmiki), Aja is the son of Nābhāga (Nabhaga)— nābhāgasya vabhūvājaḥ. However, in most of the Pūraṇas (Purana), Aja is the son of Raghu of the Ikṣvāku (Ikshvaku) clan, and the father of Daśaratha (Dasharatha). According to Matsyapūraṇa (Matsyapurana), Aja or Ajaka is the […]

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  • Aja – 17

    Aja is one of the sons of Uttama (or Auttama) Manu, the lord of the third epoch (manvantara).

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  • Ajagava

    Pināka (Pinaka), the bow of Śiva (Siva),  is also known as ‘Ājagava’ (Ajagava). This is called ‘Ajakava’, ‘Ajakāva'(Ajakava)  or ‘Ajagāva’. The way the word ‘Ajakava’ has been analysed in Śabdakalpadruma, seems to indicate that the ‘ka’ has been transformed into ‘ga’ through linuisic evolution. The Puraṅa-scholars  state that ‘aja’ refers to Viṣṇu (Visnu) who is […]

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  • Ajaka – 1

    According to Bhāgavatapurāṇa (Bhagavatapurana), Vijaya was one of the sons of Purūravā (Pururava) born of Urvaśī (Urvashi). The royal sage Jahṇu (Jahnu) was a descendent of Vijaya. According to Bhāgavatapurāṇa, Jahṇu’s son was called Puru, and Puru’s son was Balāka (Balaka), and Balāka’s son was Ajaka. Ajaka had a son named Kuśa (Kusha). According to […]

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  • Akalinga

    A locality situated in the middle part of the country (ancient India). Elsewhere it has also been referred to as ‘Kaliṅga’ (Kalinga). [See Kaliṅga] 

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  • Akapi

    Akapi is one of the seven sages existing at the time of the fourth epoch, known as Tāmasa manvantara (Tamasa manwantara). The name Akapi can be found only in Matsyapurāṇa (Matsyapurana) and in connection with another sage named Kapi of the same sect. The names of the seven sages present during the Tāmasa manvantara recorded in […]

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  • Akritabrana

    A sage. His original name is unknown. He was one of Paraśurāma’s (Parashurama) most favourite disciple-companions. At the time of his first meeting with Paraśurāma in his childhood, Akṛtabraṇa (Akritabrana) introduced himself as the son of a hermit named Sānta (Shanta). He declared himself as a miserable friendless, desolate and orphaned, seeking shelter from Paraśurāma. […]

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  • Akrodhana

    Son of Āyu (Aayu) (also known as Taritāyu) (Taritayu)—taritāyusto’bhavat.   akrodhanastvāyusutaḥ. Akrodhana is an ancestor of Pratīpa (Pratipa), Śāntanu (Shantanu) and other Kaurava kings. The narrator or the scribe of Vāyupurāṇa (Vayupurana), have chronicled him to be Ayutāyu (Ayutayu) or Ayutāyudha’s (Ayutayudha’s) son. According to Mahābhārata (Mahabharata), Akrodhana was born of King Ayutanāyī (Ayutanayi) of […]

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  • Akrura – 1

    Born in the Vṛṣṇi (Vrishni) clan, Akrūra (Akrura) was one of Kṛṣṇa ‘s (Krishna’s) kinsmen. He has been referred to as a Vṛṣṇi hero in Mahābhārāta (Mahabharata) time and again. In Mahābhārata, several heroes from the Vṛṣṇi clan attended Draupadī’s svayaṃvara (swayamvara) as her suitors. The Pāñcāla (Panchala) prince Dhṛṣtyadyumna (Dhrishtadyumna), while listing the names […]

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  • Aksha – 2

    A game of dice. It involves gambling. Ṛtuparṇa (Rituparna) and Śakuni (Shakuni) were experts at this game. Ṛtuparṇa taught this game to King Nala. Playing akṣa (aksha) has been considered a wanton vice to be abandoned for kings.

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  • Alakananda

    Alakānandā (Alakananda) is the name of a pilgrimage site, named after the river. It is said that the river is situated in heaven. Mandākinī (Mandakini) emerges from the feet of God Viṣṇu (Vishnu). After falling upon Merupṛṣṭha (Meruprishtha), the same Mandākinī comes to be known by four names, as it flows in four different directions. […]

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  • Alimana

    Alimāna (Alimana) is one of the kings belonging to Andhravaṁśa (Andhravamsa; the Andhra dynasty), ruling in India in Kaliyuga. He was the son of King Gotamīputra (Gotamiputra). Sātakarṇī Śivaśrī (Satakarni Sivasri) was the son of Alimāna. In the Bengal recension of Viṣṇupurāṇa (Vishnupurana), he is mentioned as Pulimāna (Pulimana).

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  • Ama – 2

    Amā (Ama) is one of the rays of the Sun. Amāvasyā (Amavasya) is the tithi on which the moon enters into Sūryamaṇḍala (Suryamandala; the rounded area covered by the says of the Sun) and stays upon the ray called Amā . The moon resides upon the ray called Amā on that day, that is why […]

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  • Amarsha

    Amarṣa (Amarsha) was the son of Sugandhi, in the genealogical line of Kuśa (Kusa), son of king Rāmacandra (Ramachandra) of Ikṣvākuvaṃśa (Ikshvakuvamsa; the Iksvaku dynasty). He had a son called Mahasvān (Mahaswan). In Bhāgavatapurāṇa (Bhagavatapurana) he is mentioned as Amarṣaṇa (Amarshana), son of Sandhi.

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  • Amrita – 1

    Amṛtā (Amrita) is one of the flows belonging to Saptagaṅgā (Saptaganga; a collective flow of seven rivers) in the mythological Plakṣadvīpa(Plakshadwipa).

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  • Amvikeya

    Amvikeya is a rough and ice-covered mountain. Another name for this mountain is Sumanā (Sumana). God Varāha(Varaha) killed the demon-king Hiraṇyākṣa (Hiranyaksha) on this mountain. Two other readings, Āmvikeya (Amvikeya)and Añcikeya (Anchikeya) can be found respectively in Vāyupurāṇa(Vayupurana) and Viṣṇupurāṇa (Vishnupurana).

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  • Amvikeya – 3

    A mountain in Śākadvīpa (Sakadwipa; the island of Saka), mentioned in Vāyupurāṇa (Vayupurana) and Viṣṇupurāṇa (Vishnupurana). In another version of Viṣṇupurāṇa (Vishnupurana), the name is given as ‘Āñcikeya’ (Anchikeya).

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  • Anagha – 7

    Anagha was the fifth of the seven sons born of Vaśiṣṭha (Vashishtha) to Urjjā (Urjja). During the third epoch of Manu (manvantara), these seven sons of Vaśiṣṭha became saptarṣi (saptarshi) [the seven sages].

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  • Anagha – 8

    While describing the future epochs of Manu (manvantara), Viṣṇupurāṇa (Vishnupurana) chronicles that during the eleventh manvantara, when Dharmasārvarṇi (Dharmasarvani) would become Manu, Anagha would be one of the seven sages or saptarṣi (saptarshi) .

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  • Anaka

    One of the sons of Ugrasena, a hero of the Vṛṣṇi(Vrishni) clan.

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  • Anakadundubhi – 2

    Vasudeva was born of the womb of Māriṣā (Marisha), or Vāsī (Vasi), daughter of King Bhoja — according to Vāyupurāṇa (Vayupurana). He is also called Ānakadundubhi (Anakadundubhi). As soon as Vasudeva was born, the gods, with their divine vision, could realise that the incarnation of the Supreme Divinity will be born in the house of […]

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  • Anala – 2

    Prajāpati (Prajapati) was Manu’s son, and Manu was Brahmā’s (Brahma’s) son. Anala was born of Prajāpati to Śāṇḍilī (Shandili). He was a luminous god. He was one of the eight Vasu. In some Purāṇas (Puranas) it is said that the eight Vasu were born of Kaśyapa (Kashyapa). In others, it is said that they were […]

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  • Anala – 6

    According to one version of Viṣṇupurāṇa (Vishnupurana), Anala was the son of Niṣadha (Nishadha) belonging to the lineage of the Ikṣvaku (Ikshvaku) king Rāmacandra’s (Ramachandra’s) eldest son, Kuśa (Kusha). Anala’s son was Nabha.

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  • Anamitra – 1

    Vṛṣṇi (Vrishni) was the son of Sātvata (Satwata) of the Yadu lineage. Yudhājit (Yudhajit) was the youngest son of Vṛṣṇi. Śini (Shini) was elder and Anamitra was the younger of Yudhājit’s two sons. Anamitra had three sons— Nighna (alternatively, Nimna), Śini (Viṣṇupurāṇa or Vishnupurana, however, does not mention a Śini being Anamitra’s son), and Vṛṣṇi […]

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  • Ananda – 5

    In the hereditary line of Priyavrata, Ānanda (Ananda) was one of the seven sons of Medhātithi (Medhatithi). This Ānanda was also the ruler of Plakṣadvīpa (Plakshadwipa; the island of Plaksha) and reigned over the varṣa (varsha, a plot of land) known by his name.

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  • Ananta- 1

    Ananta was the renowned son born to Kaśyapa (Kashyapa) and Prajāpati Dakṣa’s (Prajapati Daksha’s) ninth daughter Kadrū (Kadru). Anantadeva’s wife was called Tuṣti (Tushti). In the lower parts of the multitudes of hells lies the universal flame of annihilation or kālāgni (kalagni). Below that resides Anantadeva. Balanced on his head like a grain of mustard […]

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  • Anaranya
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