Bhagavat Purana
  • Abhira – 2

    Ābhīra (Abhira) is an ancient tribe dwelling in the basin of the river Saraśvatī (Saraswati). In Mahābhārata(Mahabharata) and Purāṇa (Purana), we find that ‘Abhīra’ is mentioned along with the Śūdra (Sudra) people — śūdrābhīragaṇāścaiva ye cāśritya sarasvatīm. In the army of Kārtavīryārjuna (Kartaviryarjuna), the Ābhīra people were included along with other non-Aryan tribes.During the battle […]

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  • Abvarana

    Bharata was the son of Ṛṣabha (Rishabha), in the genealogical line of Āgnīdhra (Agnidhra), the eldest son of Priyavrata. Five sons of Bharata were born out of the womb of Pañcajanī (Panchajani), daughter of Viśvarupa (Viswarupa). Āvaraṇa(Avarana) was one of them.  

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  • Adarsa – 2

    The dictionary meaning of the term Ādarśa (Adarsa) is darpaṇa (darpana) or ‘a miror’. In Bhāgavatapurāṇa(Bhagavatapurana) it is said that Devahūti (Devahuti), daughter of Svāyambhuva (Svayambhuva) Manu, while getting ready for her wedding, decorated herself with new clothes and jewellery, and watched her own reflection in a mirror. It is assumed that from a very […]

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  • Adbhuta – 1

    In the ninth manvantara (epoch; age of a Manu; an astronomical period of time measurement) in the future, when Dakṣasāvarṇi (Dakshasavarni) will become the supreme authority or the designated Manu,  Adbhuta will be the appointed Indra.

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  • Adhyatmiki vidya

    This is the ātmavidyā (knowledge of the self) which can help one to overcome the fears of karmavandhana (bindings of karma). It is through this knowledge that one may recognise one’s own self. Sage Kapila, the exponent of Sāṁkhya-darśana (Samkhya-darsana; Samkhya philosophy), told her mother, Devahūti (Devahuti), about this Ādhyātmikī ātmavidya (Adhyatmiki atmavidya). [see Ātmavidyā

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  • Agastya

    When God Srīhari (Shrihari) created Urvaśi (Urvashi) from his thighs, all the gods were bewitched by her. Mitra was one of the gods of the pair Mitrāvaruṇa (Mitravaruna). Urvaśī consented when Mitra sought union with her. But Varuṇa (Varuna) followed her, pulling at the corner of her dress. Urvasī told him, “Mitra has courted me […]

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  • Agastya-ashrama – 12

    There is an Agastya-āśrama (Agastya-ashrama) on Devasaha Parvata (Devasaha Hills) near Gokarṇa (Gokarna) in the region of Pāṇḍya (Pandya). This āśrama was founded by one of Agastya’s disciples, as Mahābhārata (Mahabharata) refers to this āśrama as belonging to a disciple of Agastya – āśramo’gastyaśiṣyasya puṇye devasahe girau. But Agastya himself must have set his foot […]

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  • Agastyakuta

    Agastyakūṭa (Agastyakuta) is the name of a sacred mountain peak in South India. It is also known by the names Agastya Parvata, Agastamala Hills and Pothiyar Hills. Sugrīva (Sugriva) had sent his monkey scouts and warriors to the south to look for Sītā (Sita). Before seeing them off, he had asked them to meet sage […]

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  • Agha

    Identified as an asura, he is an assassin under the command of Kṛṣṇa’s maternal uncle, Kaṃsa. He came to Vrindāvan in the form of a vicious serpent and devoured Kṛṣṇa, his companions and even his cattle, all of whom wandered into his mouth taking it to be a beautiful prairie. However, the perceptive Kṛṣṇa soon realised […]

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  • Agneyi – 1

    The habitation /abode of Agni (the god of fire) is called Āgneyī (Agneyi).

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  • Agni – 1

    Agni is the Sanskrit word for ‘fire’. Agni is one of the foremost among the Vedic deities. In regard of the number of Vedic hymns (sūkta; sukta) attributed to the deities, Agni comes only second to Indra (almost two hundred hymns have been dedicated to Agni). Since Agni’s deeds and actions are mainly observable on […]

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  • Agnibahu – 1

    Agnibāhu (Agnibahu) was the son of the fourteenth Bhautya Manu.  According to another opinion, a hermit sage during the reign of Bhautya Manu was called Agnibāhu. Bhāgavatapurāṇa (Bhagavatapurana) has identified him as Agnirvāhu (Agnirbahu). 

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  • Agnidhra – 3

    Agnīdhra (Agnidhra) was one of the ten sons born to Viśvakarmā’s (Vishwakarma) daughter Varhiṣmatī (Varhishmati) and  Svāyambhuva (Swayambhuva) Manu. He was made the king of Jambudvīpa (Jambudweepa) — jambudvīpeśvaraṃ cakre agnīdhrantu mahābbalam.  According to some other Puranic variations, all of these ten scions of Manu were not sons of Svāyambhuva Manu, but his grandsons – sons […]

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  • Agnihotra

    Pṛśni (Prishni), the wife of Savitā (Savita), a representative form of Sūrya (Surya), gave birth to a sacrificial rite of immense significance known as agnihotra.  Agnihotra has been compared to the grinding of teeth of yajñavaraha (yajnavaraha), the sacrificial boar conceptualised as the mythical presiding deity of a yajña (yajna).  Bhāgavatapurāṇa (Bhagavatapurana) opines, while commenting on the […]

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  • Agnimitra – 1

    Agnimitra was the son of Puṣyamitra Śuṅga (Pushyamitra Shunga), the king of Magadha in the epoch of Kali. Agnimitra’s son was called Sujyeṣṭha (Sujyeshtha). Agnimitra reigned for a period of eight years. 

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  • Agnimitra – 2

    Agnimitra was a disciple of Bāskala (Baskala). 

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  • Agnipurana

    Agnipurāṇa (Agnipurana) says about itself — āgneye hi purāṇe’smin sarvā vidyā pradarśitāḥ.  This means that every branch of knowledge that people need to possess is contained in it. There is not a single aspect concerning the world and life that has been left out of the Agnipurāṇa. This Purāṇa has a total of 383 chapters. According […]

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  • Agnishtoma – 1

    The characteristics of agniṣṭoma yajña (agnishtoma yajna) encapsulate the essence of the entire somayajña (somayajna). Those yajña the details which have been directly laid down by the śruti (shruti; another name of Veda) are known as prakṛti (prakriti) or ‘essence’. Aitareya Brāhmaṇa (Aitareya Brahmana) carries an anecdote about how agniṣṭoma yajña came into being. It is […]

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  • Agnishtoma – 2

    Agniṣṭoma (Agnishtoma) was one of the ten sons born to Naḍvalā (Nadwala), fathered by Cākṣuṣa (Chakshusha) Manu. Because of this he has been referred to as Nāḍvaleya (Nadvaleya) Manu.  Matsyapurāṇa (Matsyapurana) and Brahmāṇḍapurāṇa (Brahmandapurana) refer to him by the name Agniṣṭut (Agnishtut). 

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  • Agnishvatta

    Agniṣvātta (Agnishvatta) is the term referring to a particular sect of the manes (pitṛ; pitri) as well as the space allocated to them. The region called Agniṣvātta, named after the pitṛ residing there, is located in the south of the cosmos, beneath the Earth and above the upper regions of the abyss called atala — […]

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  • Agnivarna

    In the main Rāmāyaṇa (Ramayana) the great sage Vaśiṣṭha (Vashishtha) is seen introducing the Solar Dynasty (Sūryavaṃśa; Suryavangsha) before Rāmacandra’s (Ramachandra) marriage. In this description Agnivarṇa is mentioned as Sudarśana’s (Sudarshana) son and the father of Śīghra (Shighra) or Śīghraga (Shighraga). All of them are Rāmacandra’s ancestors. But in Purāṇas (Purana), Kuśa (Kusha) is Rāmacandra’s […]

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  • Agniveshya – 2

    Agniveśya (Agniveshya) was an incarnation of Agni, the Fire-god. Agni himself was born as a son of Devadatta, a descendant in the line of Nariṣyanta (Narishyanta), son of Manu. Agniveśya was also known by the names Kānīna (Kanin) and Jātukarṇa (Jatukarna). Agniveśya’s lineage came to be known as Agniveśyāyana (Agniveshyayan). Purāṇas (Purana) even contain a […]

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  • Agnivesyana

    In the genealogical line of Nariṣyanta (Narishyanta), son of Vaivasvata Manu, the god of Agni (fire) was born as an incarnation named Agniveśya. The famous Brāhmaṇa (Brahmana) clan that came of this Agniveśya (Agnibesya), was known as Āgniveśyāna (Agnibesyana). This Agniveśya is also known as Jātukarṇa.

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  • Ahamyati

    Ahaṁyāti (Ahamyati) is the son of king Saṁyāti (Samyati), belonging to Puruvaṁśa (Puruvamsa; the genealogical line of Puru). In Mahabhārata (Mahabharata) it is said that Ahaṁyāti was born of the womb of Varāṅgī (Varangi), daughter of king Dṛśadvān (Drisadwan), and wife of Saṁyāti. Bhānumatī, daughter of king Kṛtavīrya(Kritavirya) was the wife of Ahaṁyāti. A son […]

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  • Ahuki

    One of the branches of Yaduvaṁśa (Yaduvamsa; the genealogical line of Yadu) is Kukura. Punarvasu, belonging to this Kukuravaṁśa (Kukuravamsa), had a son and a daughter, namely, Āhuka(Ahuka) and Āhukī (Ahuki). Punarvasu probably passed away before the marriage of Āhukī. So it has been mentioned in the Purāṇas (Purana; Mythological Scriptures), that Ākuka got his […]

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  • Aidabida – 1

    In the lineage of Ikṣvāku (Ikshwaku) dynasty, Aiḍaviḍa (Aidavida) is the son of Daśaratha(Dasaratha) and father of Viśvasaha (Viswasaha).

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  • Aja – 04

    In Rāmāyaṇa (Ramayana), according to ādikavi (adikavi; the first poet, i.e., Vālmīki; Valmiki), Aja is the son of Nābhāga (Nabhaga)— nābhāgasya vabhūvājaḥ. However, in most of the Pūraṇas (Purana), Aja is the son of Raghu of the Ikṣvāku (Ikshvaku) clan, and the father of Daśaratha (Dasharatha). According to Matsyapūraṇa (Matsyapurana), Aja or Ajaka is the […]

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  • Aja – 13

    According to Bhāgavatapurāṇa (Bhagavatapurana), in the lineage of Agnīdhra (Agnidhra), the king of Jamvudvīpa (Jamvudweepa), the royal sage Bharata was the son of Ṛṣabhadeva (Rishabhadeva). Pratihartā (Pratiharta) was the descendant of Bharata. Aja was the son born of Stuti and fathered by Pratihartā.

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  • Aja – 14

    Bhūta was a sage. Prajāpati Dakṣa (Prajapati Daksha) married off his two daughters to him. One of the daughters was named Sarupā (Sarupa; according to another variation her name was Surabhi). Eleven Rudra were fathered by him to Sarupā. Aja was one of them. Every Rudra was the lord of many other Rudra, i.e., the […]

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  • Aja – 15

    Aja was the descendant of Nimi of the Solar Dynasty (Sūryavaṃśa; Suryavangsha). He is the son of Ūrdhvaketu Janaka (Urdhvaketu Janaka) and father of Purujit Janaka.

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  • Ajaka – 1

    According to Bhāgavatapurāṇa (Bhagavatapurana), Vijaya was one of the sons of Purūravā (Pururava) born of Urvaśī (Urvashi). The royal sage Jahṇu (Jahnu) was a descendent of Vijaya. According to Bhāgavatapurāṇa, Jahṇu’s son was called Puru, and Puru’s son was Balāka (Balaka), and Balāka’s son was Ajaka. Ajaka had a son named Kuśa (Kusha). According to […]

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  • Ajana – 1

    Parents of Buddha. We come to know it from the line buddho nāmnā’janasutaḥ. A different reading can be found where jana-suta has been replaced with jinasutaḥ (‘buddho nāmnā jinasutaḥ). This is how it has been explained by most of the annotators.  

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  • Ajana – 2

    One of the names of Kṛṣṇa (Krishna). The meaning of the word ajana or aja is birthless. Different manifestations of the godhead, like Nārāyaṇa (Narayana) and Viṣṇu (Vishnu) are called aja or ajana. Therefore the miraculous and divine birth of Kṛṣṇa also stems from ajana: he was born of the birthless.  

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  • Ajanabha

    Ajanābha (Ajanabha) is another name for Ṛṣabha-varṣa (Rishabha-varsha). Later it also came to be known as Bhārata (Bharata). The land is mentioned Anuśāsanaparva (Anusasanaparva) of Mahābhārata (Mahabharata).

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  • Ajita – 1

    Ajita is overall considered to be the definition of Śṛi (Shri; a respectful way of addressing males in Indian society) Hari [another name for Viṣṇu (Vishnu) or Kṛṣṇa (Krishna)]. Etymologically the word means undefeated and since Viṣṇu (Vishnu) has never faced defeat at the hands of any of his adversaries he is known as Ajita. During the […]

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  • Akritabrana

    A sage. His original name is unknown. He was one of Paraśurāma’s (Parashurama) most favourite disciple-companions. At the time of his first meeting with Paraśurāma in his childhood, Akṛtabraṇa (Akritabrana) introduced himself as the son of a hermit named Sānta (Shanta). He declared himself as a miserable friendless, desolate and orphaned, seeking shelter from Paraśurāma. […]

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  • Akriya

    Nahuṣa (Nahusha), Kṣatravṛddha (Kshatrabriddha), Rajī (Raji), Rambha and Anenā (Anena) were the five sons born to Purūravā’s (Pururba’s) son Āyu (Ayu). Akriya was the son of Gambhīra (Gambhira), a descendant of Āyu’s fourth son, Rambha.

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  • Akrura – 1

    Born in the Vṛṣṇi (Vrishni) clan, Akrūra (Akrura) was one of Kṛṣṇa ‘s (Krishna’s) kinsmen. He has been referred to as a Vṛṣṇi hero in Mahābhārāta (Mahabharata) time and again. In Mahābhārata, several heroes from the Vṛṣṇi clan attended Draupadī’s svayaṃvara (swayamvara) as her suitors. The Pāñcāla (Panchala) prince Dhṛṣtyadyumna (Dhrishtadyumna), while listing the names […]

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  • Aksha – 2

    A game of dice. It involves gambling. Ṛtuparṇa (Rituparna) and Śakuni (Shakuni) were experts at this game. Ṛtuparṇa taught this game to King Nala. Playing akṣa (aksha) has been considered a wanton vice to be abandoned for kings.

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  • Akuti 2

    In the geanealogy of Pṛyavrata, the eldest son of Svāyambhūba (Swambhuba; self-emerged)Manu, Ākūti is the wife of Pṛthusena, son of Bibhu. A son named Nakta was born out of the union between Pṛthusena and Ākūti.

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  • Alakananda

    Alakānandā (Alakananda) is the name of a pilgrimage site, named after the river. It is said that the river is situated in heaven. Mandākinī (Mandakini) emerges from the feet of God Viṣṇu (Vishnu). After falling upon Merupṛṣṭha (Meruprishtha), the same Mandākinī comes to be known by four names, as it flows in four different directions. […]

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  • Amarka

    Amarka was one of the sons of Śūkrācārya (Sukracharya), guru of the Daitya(Demons). He taught Prahlāda(Prahlada), son of Hiraṇyakaśipu (Hiranyakasipu) and other Asura-boys about Daṇḍanīti (Dandaniti; codes of law and administration). [See Prahlāda(Prahlada)]

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  • Amarsha

    Amarṣa (Amarsha) was the son of Sugandhi, in the genealogical line of Kuśa (Kusa), son of king Rāmacandra (Ramachandra) of Ikṣvākuvaṃśa (Ikshvakuvamsa; the Iksvaku dynasty). He had a son called Mahasvān (Mahaswan). In Bhāgavatapurāṇa (Bhagavatapurana) he is mentioned as Amarṣaṇa (Amarshana), son of Sandhi.

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  • Amita – 1

    According to Bhāgavatapurāṇa (Bhagavatapurana), Jaya was the youngest of the sons born of the womb of Urvaśi (Urvasi) , and sired by Pururavā(Pururava). Amita was the son of this Jaya.

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  • Amritaugha

    Ghṛtapṛṣṭha (Ghritaprishtha), son of Priyavrata, divided Krauñcadvīpa (Kraunchadwipa) in seven varṣa(s) (varsha; a vast plot of land). There is a varṣanadī (varshanadi; a major river flowing across the varsha) in each varṣa. Amṛtaughā (Amritaugha) is the name of the varṣanadī of Madhuraha varṣa (varsha).

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  • Amvikavana

    Amvikāvana(Amvikavana) is a forest on the bank of the river Sarasvatī (Saraswati). God Śiva (Siva)and Goddess Amvikā(Amvika) are worshiped here. A snake called Uraga, cursed by a Brahmaṇa (Brahmana), got rid of his curse here, in this forest, by the touch of the feet of Kṛṣṇa (Krishna) , and got his handsome form back. Before […]

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  • Amvudhara

    In the ninth Manvantara of the future, when Dakṣasāvarṇi (Dakshasavarni) will be Manu, ruler of the Manvantara, God Viṣṇu (Vishnu) will be incarnated on earth, in the name of Ṛṣabha (Rishabha). His father will be Āyuṣmān (Ayushman) and mother will be Amvudhārā (Amvudhara).

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  • Anaka – 1

    Ānaka(Anaka) is one one of the sons of Māriṣā (Marisha), sired by Śura (Sura), a valiant hero of the Vṛṣṇi (Vrishni) clan. He is the younger brother of Vasudeva — father of Śri Kṛṣṇa (Sri Krishna).

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  • Anaka – 2

    One kind of musical instrument covered with leather. This instrument is also known as mṛdaṇga. When Vasudeva was born, the gods were playing ānaka(anaka) or mṛdaṇga (mridanga). In Mahābhārata (Mahabharata) and the Purāṇas (Purana), it is found that this instrument was played before some festivities, celebrations, before the beginning of a battle or to celebrate […]

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  • Anaranya
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