Vayupurana
  • A

    A or a-kāra is the first orthographical representation of the first sound in the universe – the sound with which begins what is identified as logos – akārastvakṣaro jñeyaḥ.  A is the first syllable of the holy chant of Om (formally called Omkara, pronounced Aum, comprising the syllables a-u-ma). A is considered to be a […]

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  • A

    In the beginning of Creation, fourteen vowel-sounds (svaradhvani) were created from the mouth of the four-faced Brahmā (Brahma). Manu, the ruler of fourteen manvantara (manvantara; epoch) was born out of these fourteen vowel-sounds. Ā (A) or Ā-kāra (a-kara) was the second of these vowel sounds emanated from Brahmā’s second mouth. From this Ā-kāra (A-kara), emanated Svāyambhuba Manu. In the […]

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  • Abhramu

    Abhramū (Abhramu) is the wife of the elephant Airāvata (Airavata). Añjana (Anjana), Supratīka (Supratika), Vāmana (Vamana), and Padma — these four ‘Diggaja'(s) (Four mythical elephants, protecting the four sides) were born of the womb of Abhramū, and sired by Airāvata. See Dighastinī (Dighastini).

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  • Abhumi – 2

    According to Brahmāṇḍapurāṇa (Brahmandapurana) and Vāyupurāṇa (Vayupurana), Abhūmi (Abhumi) was the son of Citraka (Chitraka), belonging to Yadu-Vṛṣṇi (Yadu-Vrishni) vaṃśa (vamsa).

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  • Achala – 6

    Acala (Achala) was the son of the great sage Pratyūṣa (Pratyusha). It is known that he was a devarṣi (devarshi; divine saint).

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  • Achchhavaka

    In the Vedic procedure of Somayāga (Somayaga) three priests or ṛttvika (rittwika) help the high priest hotā (hota) during the collective chanting of hymns from scriptures. One of these three assisting priests is acchaāvāka (achchhavaka); the other two are called maitrāvaruṇa (maitravaruna) and brāhmaṇācchaṃsī (brahmanachchhamsi). Together, these three assistants are called hotraka. A shed or maṇḍapa […]

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  • Achchhoda

    Acchoda (Achchhoda) is one of the greatest of all the famous lakes mentioned in Purāṇas (Puranas). In significance it is at par with the lakes Mānasa and Vindu. Due to variance in pronunciation it is sometimes spelled as Akṣoda (Akshoda). The lake was dug by a particular sect of manes called Agniṣvātta (Agnishvatta). It is […]

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  • Achchhoda

    The river Acchodā (Achchhoda) emerged out of lake Acchoda (Achchhoda). The famous Caitraratha (Chaitraratha) forest was located on the banks of this river. According to a story in Purāṇas (Puranas), Acchodā was the mānasī (manasi; female conceived by the mind) daughter of a sect of divine manes called Agniṣvātta (Agnisvatta). Her form was that of […]

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  • Adarsa – 1

    According to Vāyupurāṇa (Vayupurana) and Brahmāṇdapurāṇa (Brahmandapurana), Ādarśa(Adarsa) is one of the sons of Sāvarṇi (Savarni) Manu in the eleventh Manvantara, in future.

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  • Adarsa – 1

    According to Vāyupurāṇa (Vayupurana) and Brahmāṇḍapurāṇa (Brahmandapurana), Ādarśa(Adarsa) is one of the sons of Sāvarṇi(Savarni) Manu in the eleventh Manvantara of the future.

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  • Adbhuta – 2

    A son of Savana, a fire.

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  • Adhahshira – 1

    Adhaḥśirā (Adhahshira) or Adhaḥśiras (Adhahshiras) is a foremost type of hell. Purāṇas (Purana) mention and distinctly elaborate upon numerous hells, and also accord specific types of hell after death for committing specific sins in a lifetime.  Adhaḥśirā is one prominent hell among those. This hell is also known in some places as Adhomukha. 

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  • Adhana

    Ādhana was one of the sons born of the womb of Ūrjjā (Urja), sired by Vaśisṭha (Vasistha).

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  • Adhipati

    Adhipati is the youngest of Bhṛgu’s (Bhrigu) sons out of the twelve somapayī deities (somapayi , the deities who can be pleased with soma, a Vedic ritual drink) born to the great sage Bhṛgu  and Devī (Devi).

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  • Adhishta

    At the beginning of Creation, twelve gods were born from Brahmā’s (Brahma) mouth. Created at the inception of the world, these twelve gods were classified under the gaṇa (gana) [here, a group or class] of deities named Jaya. Adhīṣṭa (Adhishta) was one of the twelve Jaya deities.

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  • Adhisimakrishna

    Different purāṇas (puranas) refer to King Adhisīmakṛṣṇa (Adhisimakrishna) as Adhisāmakṛṣṇa (Adhisamakrishna) or Adhisomakṛṣṇa (Adhisomakrishna), but the most commonly used name was Adhisīmakṛṣṇa. Abhimanyu’s grandson was Pārīkṣita (Parikshita) Janamejaya whose son was known as Śatānīka (Shatanika). According to Matsyapurāṇa (Matsyapurana), Adhisomakṛṣṇa was the son of Śatānīka. However, other Purāṇas record that Śatānīka’s son was Aśvamedhadatta (Ashwamedhadatta).This piece […]

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  • Adhiti

    At the beginning of Creation, twelve gods were born from Brahmā’s (Brahma’s) mouth. They were classified under the gaṇa (gana) [here, a group or class] of deities named ‘Jaya’. Adhīti (Adhiti) was one of the twelve Jaya deities.

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  • Adhvara

    The word adhvara signifies yajña (yajna). The verbal root dhvar means to be violent. Subsequently, the words dhvaraṇa (dhvarana), or dhvara mean violence. That which has no brutality is known as adhvara— adhvara iti yajñanāma. dhvaratirhiṃsākarmā. During yajñas, grace is bestowed on everyone. The question, however, may arise that there is violence in the animal sacrifice involved in […]

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  • Adhvaryu

    At the outset of yajña (yajna) ceremonies, the priest of Ṛgveda (Rigveda), or ṛtvika (ritwika) used to execute the functions of both the priest and the hotā (hota) or the performer of the yajña. [See Ṛtvika, Hotā] Later, when the rituals of a yajña became more intricate, four priests or ṛtvika of Caturveda (Chaturveda) were appointed separate vedic tasks. […]

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  • Adi-vaka – 2

    In the Purāṇas (Purana), twelve great battles between the Devas (gods) and the Asuras (a kind of demons) have been described. The sixth battle is known as Āḍi-vaka (Adi-vaka). Kakutstha, son of King Śaśāda (Sasada) of the Ikṣvāku (Iksvaku) clan, helped Indra in this battle. Virocana (Virochana), son of Prahlāda (Prahlada), died at the hand […]

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  • Adipala

    Another name of God Viṣṇu (Vishnu). He is famous as Ādipāla (Adipala) in Gayā (Gaya).

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  • Aditya – 3

    Forty nine ‘Marut’ devatā ( devata; gods) were born out of the womb of Dakṣa’s (Daksha) daughter Diti, sired by Kaśyapa (Kasyapa) Prajāpati (prajapati; Ruler of the people). These forty nine gods were divided in seven gaṇa (gana, genus). Āditya(Aditya) was one of the seven gods included in the first gaṇa. However, in the reading […]

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  • Adrika

    One of the apsarās (apsaras) born of Prajāpati Kaśyapa (Prajapati Kashyapa) to Dakṣa’s (Daksha’s) daughter Muni. It is known that when King Uparicara (Uparichara) Vasu used to reside in the divine seven storied abode given to him by Indra, Adrikā, the apsarā, used to live there with him. One day, while King Uparicaravasu (Amāvasu or […]

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  • Adwishena

    A sage. Purāṇas (Puranas) mention a number of sages as mantradraṣṭā (mantradrashta) or seers who realized Vedas.  Adviṣeṇa (Adwishena) is one significant mantradraṣṭa.

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  • Adya – 2

    Ādya is one of the gaṇa ( classificatory genus) of the gods as per the classification existing in the Cākṣuṣa (Chakshusha) Manvantara.

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  • Agabaha

    Mahābhārata (Mahabharata) mentions  Agāvaha (Agabaha) who was a brave warrior from the Vṛṣṅi clan. During the Kurukṣetra (Kurukshetra) war, Dhṛtarāṣtra (Dhritarashtra), who had become very anxious at the death of Abhimanyu, expressed his concern that this incident could enrage the warriors of the Vṛṣṅi clan and incite them to leave the Kauravas’s side for joining the […]

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  • Agamya

    Agamyāśca na gaccheta, meaning, “never transgress social customs and engage in coitus with agamyā, or inaccessible women”, is a directive expressed in Mahābhārata (Mahabharata), along with a catalogue of certain relationships that lay outside the bounds of copulation. These women were, therefore, agamyā, or ‘inaccessible’. This list included a king’s wife, wife’s friend, wife of a learned […]

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  • Agastya

    The rākṣasa (rakshasa, a type of demons) belonging to the clan of Agastya. In the Purāṇas, it is described that Kuvera, king of the yakṣa (yaksa; a type of demi-gods), was their ruler.

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  • Agastya

    When God Srīhari (Shrihari) created Urvaśi (Urvashi) from his thighs, all the gods were bewitched by her. Mitra was one of the gods of the pair Mitrāvaruṇa (Mitravaruna). Urvaśī consented when Mitra sought union with her. But Varuṇa (Varuna) followed her, pulling at the corner of her dress. Urvasī told him, “Mitra has courted me […]

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  • Agastya-ashrama – 12

    There is an Agastya-āśrama (Agastya-ashrama) on Devasaha Parvata (Devasaha Hills) near Gokarṇa (Gokarna) in the region of Pāṇḍya (Pandya). This āśrama was founded by one of Agastya’s disciples, as Mahābhārata (Mahabharata) refers to this āśrama as belonging to a disciple of Agastya – āśramo’gastyaśiṣyasya puṇye devasahe girau. But Agastya himself must have set his foot […]

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  • Agastyakunda

    Agastyakuṇḍa (Agastyakunda) is a spring on Udyantaka Parvata (Udyantaka Hills). The spring is so called because sage Agastya had set up this mountain at this place. Eight sages, like Vyāsa (Vyasa) and Śuka (Shuka), had obtained salvation by performing tapasyā (tapasya) at this place. It is said that auspicious results may be obtained by one […]

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  • Agastyapada

    A holy place in Gayā (Gaya) that has the same sanctity as Viṣṇu’s (Vishnu) lotus feet. Performance of funeral rites at this spot are considered as acts of great piety.

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  • Aghor – 1

    The incarnation of god in a form black as night in the thirty-second kalpa. The desire to create man darkened Prajāpati Brahmā’s (Prajapati Brahma) appearance. While in this form, He prayed with the aghora mantra to worship Mahādeva (Mahadeva), the lord of the universe.

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  • Agneya – 1

    Once in a place of yajña (yajna) organised by the god Varuṇa (Varuna), wives and daughters of gods were also present with the Gandharvas (a kind of demi-gods). Seeing them, Brahmā (Brahma) got erotically charged and he had an erection. When he offered it to the yajña-fire, Bhṛgu (Bhrigu) was born of that. When he […]

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  • Agneya – 6

    There is a mention of fifteen rātri-muhūrta (ratri-muhurta; nocturnal moments) — such as, Prājāpatya (Prajapatya), Brāhma (Brahma), Vārhaspatya (Varhaspatya) and so on. Āgneya(Agneya) is one of them.

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  • Agneya – 7

    A genus of the Gandharvas (a kind of demi-gods) is called Āgneya (Agneya). They are the followers of Kuvera. Vāyupurāṇa (Vayupurana) says that  the Āgneya-Gandharvas live in the mountain Devakūta (Devakuta).

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  • Agneya – 9

    A kind of divine weapon used in warfare in ancient times. After the completion of the Pāṇdava (Pandava) and Kaurava princes, Droṇācarya (Dronacharya) made arrangements for an exhibition of their military skills. In that arena, Arjuna displayed his skill as an archer, by using āgneya astra (agneya astra; firey weapon) to create fire. Sri Kṛṣna […]

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  • Agni – 1

    Agni is the Sanskrit word for ‘fire’. Agni is one of the foremost among the Vedic deities. In regard of the number of Vedic hymns (sūkta; sukta) attributed to the deities, Agni comes only second to Indra (almost two hundred hymns have been dedicated to Agni). Since Agni’s deeds and actions are mainly observable on […]

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  • Agnibahu – 1

    Agnibāhu (Agnibahu) was the son of the fourteenth Bhautya Manu.  According to another opinion, a hermit sage during the reign of Bhautya Manu was called Agnibāhu. Bhāgavatapurāṇa (Bhagavatapurana) has identified him as Agnirvāhu (Agnirbahu). 

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  • Agnibahu – 2

    Agnibāhu (Agnibahu) was one of the ten sons of Svāyambhūva (Swayambhuva) Manu.  According to a different opinion, Agnibāhu was one of the ten sons of Svayambhuva Manu’s eldest son, Priyavrata. Brahmāṇḍapurāṇa (Brahmandapurana) says that Priyavrata’s wife was Kāmyā (Kamya), the daughter of Kardama Prajāpati (Prajapati). Agnibāhu was born to this Kāmyā. Agnibāhu carried memories from […]

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  • Agnibhasa

    Amṛtātmā (Amritatma) was one of the gaṇa (gana or groups) into which the gods were divided during the Raivata manvantara (epoch). Agnibhāsa was one of fourteen deities belonging to this gaṇa. 

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  • Agnidharatirtha

    Agnidhārātīrtha (Agnidharatirtha) is a riverside site of pilgrimage in Gayātīrtha (Gayatirtha). Agnidhārā is a river that has its source on the Udyantaka Hills — agnidhārā girivarādāgatyodyantakāduna. It is a place considered extremely sacred for performing funeral rites of the manes and offering of the obsequial cake to them.  Scholars differ in their opinions regarding the […]

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  • Agnidhra – 1

    Agnīdhra (Agnidhra) was the son of Bhautya Manu, the lord of the fourteenth epoch (manvantara). According to a different opinion, Agnīdhra was one of the seven great sages (saptarṣi; saptarshi) during the reign of Bhautya Manu. 

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  • Agnidhra – 2

    Legends say, Agni, the Fire-god, had one desired sixteen rivers, namely Kāverī (Kaveri or Cauvery), Kṛṣñaveṇī (Krishnaveni), Narmadā (Narmada) and others. Basically, this marital relationship was envisaged because it was on the banks of these famous rivers that worship of the Vedic deity Agni started being practiced and flourished. Here the rivers have been identified […]

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  • Agnidhra – 3

    Agnīdhra (Agnidhra) was one of the ten sons born to Viśvakarmā’s (Vishwakarma) daughter Varhiṣmatī (Varhishmati) and  Svāyambhuva (Swayambhuva) Manu. He was made the king of Jambudvīpa (Jambudweepa) — jambudvīpeśvaraṃ cakre agnīdhrantu mahābbalam.  According to some other Puranic variations, all of these ten scions of Manu were not sons of Svāyambhuva Manu, but his grandsons – sons […]

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  • Agnihotra

    Pṛśni (Prishni), the wife of Savitā (Savita), a representative form of Sūrya (Surya), gave birth to a sacrificial rite of immense significance known as agnihotra.  Agnihotra has been compared to the grinding of teeth of yajñavaraha (yajnavaraha), the sacrificial boar conceptualised as the mythical presiding deity of a yajña (yajna).  Bhāgavatapurāṇa (Bhagavatapurana) opines, while commenting on the […]

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  • Agnijihva – 1

    A demon who dwells on the fifth plane of pātāla (patal; ‘the underworld’) which is known as mahātala (mahatal). 

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  • Agnijwal – 1

    Agnijvāla is the name of one of the Hells. Those who disturb and torture sages dwelling in hermitages are condemned to spend their afterlife in this Hell.  According to a different opinion, this Hell is the destination for a person who strays from the particular phase of Caturāśrama (Chaturashram) which that person is bound to […]

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  • Agnika

    Prajāpati Vikrānta (Prajapati Vikranta) was the father of the gandharvas Āgneya (Agneya) and Bāleya (Baleya). He also had three beautiful daughters, one of whom was Agnikā (Agnika).

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  • Agnikshetra

    The plot of land that spreads out towards the east of the large elevated altar constructed for conducting yajña (yajna) is known as agnikṣetra (agnikshetra). A fire in the shape of a falcon needs to be lit and maintained within this plot of land. Owing to the importance of this fire or agni, this plot […]

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